Menu
Your Cart

Hot chili peppers seeds online

Packing/number of seeds: 1 g (130 - 150 seeds of Calabrese chilli pepper) Sowing rate: E..
1.50USD
Packing / number of seeds: 1 g (130 - 150 cayenne pepper seeds) Sowing rate: 150 to 180 ..
1.70USD
Packing / number of seeds: 1 g (130 - 150 Ungarian Vaks Hot chili peppers seeds) Sowing ..
1.50USD
Packing / number of seeds: 1 g (about 130 - 150 seeds of red chilli peppers Rokita) Sowi..
1.70USD
Showing 1 to 4 of 4 (1 Pages)

Under this category in our online store you will come across an incredible variety of varietal seeds of an unexpected favorite of young and old, namely Hot peppers. Considered by many to be a longevity food due to its powerful combination of carotenoids and vitamins, chilies, also known as peppers, are known as the hot food that works wonders for the body.

Hot peppers are fruits that come from tropical shrubs of the genus Capsicum. Their history dates back to the time when peppers were grown as a spice in Mexico.

It is believed that it was the discoverer Christopher Columbus who opened the world to chili culture by mistakenly bringing chili peppers from Mexico to America, thinking he was bringing them to India.

An interesting fact is that because of this confusion, chilies got mixed up with black pepper, which led to the many different names they now have around the world.

The main characteristic of peppers is their content of the phenolic compound capsaicin. The content of this substance is the key factor for their main characteristic - the bitter taste. Besides the taste, they are also known for their strong aroma.

The popularity of mushrooms is also due to the great substances that are contained in their composition. Hot chili Peppers are rich in vitamins and the powerful antioxidant carotenoid. The last listed is responsible for the pigmentation of vegetables and fruits, such as carrots, tomatoes and other brightly colored crops. Its effect on the body is astounding, and it is believed to help prevent cancer and slow down aging.

The powerful combination of vitamin C and carotenoids makes chili pepper very useful and a serious anti-aging and anti-aging agent. Supports heart health, strengthens immunity, helps with stress and colds.

The hot taste stimulates the metabolism and it is believed that peppers are a perfect means for melting extra pounds.

The hot culture boasts numerous varieties that have different external markings and differ in their degree of pepperiness.

In fact, there is a special scale that measures the degree of spiciness of the gourds and classifies them. Its name is the Scoville scale and is named after Wilbur Lincoln Scoville, an American chemist who was involved in measuring the amount of capsaicin contained in hot peppers and thus invented a way to measure their hotness. The hotness of peppers is measured in SHU.

The hottest pepper that entered the Guinness World Records, with its high degree of spiciness, is the Carolina Reaper with as many as 2,200,000 SHU.

Scientists have proven that its spiciness can lead to migraines, and this is the first chili pepper to show this side effect.

Other famous varieties of chili peppers are Naga Viper, Trinidad Scorpion, Ghost Pepper, and Seven Pot.


Hot chili peppers, also known as chili peppers or chilies, are a popular ingredient in many cuisines around the world. They add a spicy kick to dishes and come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, flavors, and heat levels. Here's some information about hot chili peppers:

Heat Levels:

Chili peppers are known for their heat, which is measured on the Scoville scale. The Scoville scale assigns a numerical value to indicate the level of capsaicin, the compound responsible for the heat sensation.
Different chili pepper varieties have varying heat levels, ranging from mild to extremely hot. Examples of hot chili peppers include habanero, scotch bonnet, ghost pepper, and Carolina Reaper.
Flavor Profiles:

In addition to heat, chili peppers offer a range of flavors. Some chili peppers have a fruity, citrusy taste, while others are earthy, smoky, or even slightly sweet.
Each chili pepper variety has its own unique flavor profile, making them suitable for different culinary applications.
Culinary Uses:

Hot chili peppers are used in various dishes to add spice, depth, and complexity to the flavor.
They are often added to salsas, sauces, marinades, curries, stir-fries, and chili con carne.
Dried chili peppers can be ground into chili powder or flakes and used as a seasoning in many dishes.
Hot chili peppers are also popular for making hot sauces and for pickling.
Growing Hot Chili Peppers:

Hot chili peppers can be grown at home, either in the garden or in containers.
They require a sunny location, well-draining soil, and regular watering.
Start chili peppers from seeds or purchase young plants from a nursery.
Provide support for taller varieties to prevent the plants from toppling over.
Harvest the chili peppers when they reach the desired size and color.
Handling and Precautions:

When handling hot chili peppers, it's important to take precautions as the capsaicin can irritate the skin, eyes, and mucous membranes.
Wear gloves when handling hot peppers, especially if you have sensitive skin.
Avoid touching your face or eyes after handling chili peppers and wash your hands thoroughly afterward.
Health Benefits:

Chili peppers have several health benefits. Capsaicin, the compound responsible for the heat, is known for its pain-relieving properties and potential metabolism-boosting effects.
Chili peppers are rich in vitamins A and C, as well as antioxidants, which are beneficial for the immune system and overall health.
Remember that the heat level of chili peppers can vary, and what may be mild for some people can be extremely hot for others. When cooking with chili peppers, start with a small amount and gradually increase if desired. It's always a good idea to taste a small piece before adding it to a dish to gauge the heat level.

Enjoy the vibrant flavors and spicy heat of hot chili peppers in your favorite recipes, but remember to use them in moderation according to your taste preferences and heat tolerance.


Hot chili pepper seeds are the starting point for growing your own chili pepper plants. Here's some information about hot chili pepper seeds:

Seed Selection:

There are numerous varieties of hot chili peppers available, each with its own unique flavor profile, heat level, and appearance.
When selecting chili pepper seeds, consider the level of heat you prefer and the specific culinary uses you have in mind.
Some popular hot chili pepper varieties include habanero, jalapeno, cayenne, Thai chili, serrano, ghost pepper, and Carolina Reaper.
Seed Sources:

Chili pepper seeds can be obtained from various sources, including garden centers, seed catalogs, online seed suppliers, and even saving seeds from mature chili peppers you've enjoyed.
Ensure that you purchase seeds from reputable sources to ensure quality and viability.
Germination:

To increase the chances of successful germination, it's recommended to start chili pepper seeds indoors, especially in regions with shorter growing seasons.
Plant the seeds in seed trays or small pots filled with seed-starting mix, which provides the optimal moisture retention and drainage for germination.
Sow the seeds at a depth of approximately ¼ to ½ inch (6-12 mm) and cover them with a thin layer of soil.
Keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged, as excess moisture can cause rot.
Maintain a warm and consistent temperature, ideally between 70-85°F (21-29°C), to promote germination. Using a heating mat or placing the seed tray in a warm location can help achieve the desired temperature.
Transplanting:

Once the seedlings have developed a few sets of true leaves and the weather conditions are favorable, typically after the last frost date, they can be transplanted into larger pots or the garden.
Choose a well-draining soil with good organic matter content for transplanting.
Harden off the seedlings gradually by exposing them to outdoor conditions over a period of days to acclimate them to sunlight, wind, and temperature changes.
Space the transplants according to the specific requirements of the chili pepper variety, typically 12-24 inches (30-60 cm) apart.
Care and Maintenance:

Chili pepper plants require regular watering, especially during dry periods, but avoid overwatering to prevent root rot.
Provide the plants with full sun exposure for at least six hours a day to ensure optimal growth and fruit production.
Fertilize the plants with a balanced organic fertilizer or a fertilizer specifically formulated for vegetables, following the manufacturer's instructions.
Monitor the plants for pests and diseases, such as aphids or fungal infections, and take appropriate measures to control them.
Harvesting and Saving Seeds:

Chili peppers can be harvested when they reach the desired size and color. The exact time varies depending on the variety.
To save seeds for future plantings, select fully ripe and healthy chili peppers from the plant.
Cut the pepper open, remove the seeds, and allow them to dry thoroughly on a paper towel or a mesh screen for a few weeks.
Once the seeds are completely dry, store them in a cool, dark, and dry place in a labeled and airtight container for future use.
Remember to refer to specific growing guidelines for the particular chili pepper variety you are cultivating, as each variety may have slightly different requirements for optimal growth and productivity.

Enjoy the process of growing hot chili peppers from seeds and exploring the wide range of flavors and heat levels they offer in your culinary adventures.

Growing hot chili peppers can be a rewarding experience, and here are some general steps to help you grow them successfully:

Choose the Right Variety:

Select a hot chili pepper variety that suits your taste preferences and growing conditions.
Popular hot chili pepper varieties include jalapeno, habanero, serrano, cayenne, Thai chili, ghost pepper, and Carolina Reaper.
Consider the heat level, size, shape, and flavor of the chili peppers when making your selection.
Start Seeds Indoors (Optional):

Hot chili peppers can be started from seeds indoors, especially in regions with short growing seasons.
Start seeds 8-10 weeks before the last expected frost date in your area.
Plant the seeds in seed trays or small pots filled with seed-starting mix.
Sow the seeds at a depth of approximately ¼ to ½ inch (6-12 mm) and cover them with a thin layer of soil.
Keep the soil moist and maintain a warm temperature (70-85°F or 21-29°C) to promote germination.
Once the seedlings have developed a few sets of true leaves, they can be transplanted outdoors.
Select the Growing Location:

Choose a sunny location for your chili pepper plants. They require at least 6-8 hours of direct sunlight per day.
Ensure the soil is well-draining and rich in organic matter.
If growing in containers, use a pot with drainage holes to avoid waterlogging.
Planting Outdoors:

If you prefer to start with young plants, purchase healthy seedlings from a nursery or garden center.
Harden off the seedlings by gradually exposing them to outdoor conditions over several days.
Space the plants according to the specific requirements of the chili pepper variety, typically 12-24 inches (30-60 cm) apart.
Watering and Fertilizing:

Keep the soil evenly moist but not waterlogged. Water deeply when the top inch of soil feels dry.
Avoid overhead watering as it can increase the risk of fungal diseases. Water at the base of the plants.
Fertilize the plants regularly with a balanced fertilizer or a fertilizer specifically formulated for vegetables, following the package instructions.
Pruning and Support:

Some chili pepper plants may benefit from pruning to encourage bushier growth and increased fruit production.
Pinch or trim back the tips of the branches when the plant is about 6-8 inches (15-20 cm) tall.
Provide support, such as stakes or cages, for taller chili pepper varieties to prevent the plants from bending or breaking under the weight of the fruit.
Pest and Disease Control:

Monitor the plants regularly for pests such as aphids, spider mites, or caterpillars. Use organic pest control methods or insecticidal soap if necessary.
Be vigilant for common chili pepper diseases like powdery mildew or bacterial spot. Practice good garden hygiene and provide adequate air circulation to minimize disease risk.
Harvesting:

Harvest chili peppers when they reach the desired size and color.
Use clean, sharp scissors or pruners to cut the peppers from the plant, leaving a short stem attached.
Harvesting regularly encourages continued fruit production.
By following these guidelines, you can grow your own hot chili peppers and enjoy their spicy flavors in various culinary dishes. Remember to refer to specific growing instructions for the particular variety you choose, as different chili pepper types may have slight variations in their growth requirements.

Hot chili peppers can add a spicy kick to a variety of dishes. Here are some ways to enjoy eating hot chili peppers:

Fresh:

Slice or chop the chili pepper and add it to salads, salsas, or guacamole for a spicy and flavorful twist.
Mix finely chopped chili peppers with lime juice, salt, and other spices to create a homemade chili paste or hot sauce.
Stuff whole chili peppers with cheese or meat filling, then bake or grill them for a delicious appetizer or side dish.
Cooked:

Add sliced or diced chili peppers to stir-fries, curries, soups, stews, and sauces for an extra burst of heat.
Saute chili peppers with onions and garlic as a base for various dishes, such as chili, pasta sauces, or Mexican-inspired meals.
Roast or char chili peppers over an open flame or under the broiler until the skin blackens, then peel and use in recipes like salsas, dips, or as a topping for tacos and sandwiches.
Incorporate chili peppers into marinades for meats or vegetables to infuse them with spicy flavor before grilling or roasting.
Dried and Ground:

Dry chili peppers by stringing them together and hanging them in a dry, well-ventilated area until they become brittle.
Once fully dried, grind the chili peppers into flakes or powder using a spice grinder or mortar and pestle.
Use the dried and ground chili peppers as a seasoning in spice blends, rubs, or as a topping for pizzas, roasted vegetables, or grilled meats.
Precautions:

When handling hot chili peppers, it's advisable to wear gloves or wash your hands thoroughly afterward to avoid transferring the capsaicin, the compound responsible for the heat, to sensitive areas like your eyes or face.
Be cautious when consuming hot chili peppers if you're not accustomed to spicy foods or have a sensitive stomach, as they can cause discomfort or gastrointestinal irritation.
Start with smaller amounts of chili peppers and gradually increase the quantity as you become more accustomed to the heat.
Remember, the heat level of chili peppers can vary, so it's essential to taste a small piece or test the spice level before adding a significant amount to your dish. Adjust the quantity of chili peppers according to your desired level of spiciness. Enjoy exploring different culinary creations and experimenting with hot chili peppers to add a fiery kick to your favorite recipes.

Growing chili peppers in pots is a convenient and popular option, especially for those with limited space or wanting to grow them indoors. Here's a step-by-step guide on how to grow chili peppers in pots:

Select a Suitable Pot:

Choose a pot or container with a size appropriate for the chili pepper plant's mature size. A 10-12 inch (25-30 cm) diameter pot is generally sufficient for most varieties.
Ensure the pot has drainage holes at the bottom to prevent waterlogging.
Choose the Right Soil:

Use a well-draining potting mix specifically formulated for container gardening.
Alternatively, create a mix using equal parts of garden soil, compost, and perlite or vermiculite to improve drainage.
Start with Seeds or Seedlings:

If starting from seeds, sow them in seed trays or small pots filled with seed-starting mix.
Plant the seeds at a depth of approximately ¼ to ½ inch (6-12 mm) and cover them with a thin layer of soil.
Keep the soil moist and maintain a warm temperature (70-85°F or 21-29°C) for germination.
Once the seedlings have developed a few sets of true leaves, transplant them into the main pot.
Planting:

Fill the pot with the prepared potting mix, leaving enough space at the top for watering.
Dig a small hole in the center of the pot and carefully place the chili pepper seedling, ensuring it is at the same depth as it was in the nursery container.
Gently backfill the hole with soil, firming it around the seedling to provide stability.
Provide Adequate Sunlight:

Place the pot in a location that receives full sunlight for at least 6-8 hours per day.
If growing indoors, position the pot near a south-facing window or use grow lights to provide sufficient light.
Watering and Fertilizing:

Water the chili pepper plant thoroughly when the top inch of soil feels dry.
Avoid overwatering, as chili pepper plants prefer slightly drier conditions.
Fertilize regularly with a balanced liquid fertilizer or a slow-release fertilizer formulated for vegetables, following the package instructions.
Pruning and Support:

Pinch or trim back the tips of the chili pepper plant when it reaches a height of 6-8 inches (15-20 cm) to encourage bushier growth.
Provide support, such as a small stake or trellis, as the plant grows taller and starts producing fruit.
Pest and Disease Control:

Monitor the plant regularly for pests like aphids, spider mites, or whiteflies. Use organic pest control methods or insecticidal soap if necessary.
Keep an eye out for common chili pepper diseases such as powdery mildew or fungal infections. Ensure good air circulation around the plant and avoid overhead watering to minimize disease risk.
Harvesting:

Chili peppers can be harvested when they reach the desired size and color. The maturity time varies depending on the chili pepper variety.
Use clean, sharp scissors or pruners to cut the peppers from the plant, leaving a short stem attached.
By following these steps, you can successfully grow chili peppers in pots and enjoy a bountiful harvest of spicy peppers right at home. Remember to provide adequate care, including proper watering, sunlight, and fertilization, to ensure healthy plant growth and maximize fruit production.

See more vegetable plant seeds online