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Thyme seeds

Online vegetable seeds catalog semenata.org presents seeds on discs with Basil, Coriander,..
5.00USD
Flowering: It blooms profusely in pink color from June to September. Height: Up to..
1.50USD
Packet/ seeds amount: 4 disks with 10 cm diameter. Sowing rate: Depends on the siz..
3.00USD
Flowering: The flowers of this thyme when flowering are pink-violet, appearing from June t..
1.50USD
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In this category of our online seed store, you will find a wide variety of high-yielding and high-quality varieties of the fragrant and well-known Thyme herb. The herbaceous plant that is grown, mostly as a perennial, with a distribution of more than 350 species, is an excellent honey plant, a unique spice and a medicinal herb rich in essential oils. Also known in many places as "shepherd's basil", and not infrequently also by the name "babina dusitsa", thyme is an extremely interesting crop, with many uses, which you can grow at home.

The history of thyme is ancient, with the oldest information found about it being at least 5,000 years old. The fragrant plant found its place of honor among the ancient peoples and spread successfully, as a strong aphrodisiac among the Greeks and the equivalent of strength, according to the ancient Romans. In Ancient Egypt, thyme was one of the ingredients added to the famous oils used to embalm the mummies of the pharaohs.

In the past, thyme was a symbol of courage. In Ancient Rome, before battle, soldiers were required to bathe in water that was scented with thyme, because it was believed that it would contribute to their victory. This belief was preserved in the course of time, as in the Middle Ages maidens embroidered the aromatic plant on the tunics of the knights.

In the course of history, an interesting legend appeared about the aromatic herb, which associated it with various magics. The reason for this was actually the high concentration of essential oils in thyme, which in overdose could lead to hallucinations.

Nowadays, thyme is widespread and at least 350 species of the aromatic spice are known. The most famous are the caraway thyme, the citrus thyme, the wild thyme and the familiar to us - ordinary thyme. Common thyme is also the type that is successfully grown at home and is known as the green spice. The reason is that the part that is used of the aromatic spice is its fresh green leaves.

Thyme is successfully propagated from seed. The recommended sowing is the period after the fall of the late frosts - the end of March. It can be grown in the garden, in the yard, or in pots - on the terrace. Thyme loves direct sunlight. The culture itself is not pretentious to the soil, but if the substrate is still poor, feeding with mineral fertilizers is recommended. Before the seeds germinate, watering should be regular. After successful germination, water sparingly and be careful not to waterlog the soil.

Thyme blooms during the summer months - from the beginning of June to September. It reaches a height of 40 cm and forms delicate pink flowers. Its main characteristic is its aroma. An interesting fact is that it is strongest just before the flowering of the plant.

Another important feature of the aromatic plant is that it is an excellent honey-maker. It is a serious source of a large amount of nectar that attracts bees and it produces an amazingly fragrant honey. Thyme honey, for example, is very popular in the Balkans.

In addition to honey, thyme is known both as an aromatic spice and as a highly medicinal herb. It can be used both fresh and dried. The advantage of dried flowers is that they lose almost none of their qualities. Fresh thyme, however, has a stronger flavor.

As an herb, thyme is most often applied in a dried state, and exhibits excellent anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and pain-relieving effects. Its use in the treatment of cough is also popular because it exhibits bronchodilating and expectorant properties.

Thyme is a plant that is valued quite highly because of its honey and delicate and quite pleasant fragrance for many people. It combines perfectly with other aromatic herbs and has the unique property of enriching and complementing their aromas. An interesting fact is that it can withstand longer heat treatment and for this reason, thyme is often the first spice that you can add to the dish, before the other spices. The fragrant spice combines beautifully with beans, vegetable dishes, eggs, pasta and fish. 

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Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) is an aromatic herb that belongs to the mint family, Lamiaceae. It is native to the Mediterranean region and is widely cultivated and used in culinary and medicinal applications. Here's some information about thyme:

Culinary Uses: Thyme is known for its strong and aromatic flavor, which blends well with a wide range of dishes. It is a staple herb in Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, and European cuisines. Here are some common culinary uses of thyme:

Seasoning: Thyme leaves are used as a versatile seasoning in savory dishes, including soups, stews, sauces, roasted meats, poultry, and vegetables.
Herb Blends: Thyme is a key ingredient in popular herb blends like Herbes de Provence and bouquet garni.
Infused Oils and Vinegars: Thyme can be infused in oils and vinegars to add its distinct flavor to dressings and marinades.
Medicinal Uses: Thyme has a long history of use in traditional medicine for its potential health benefits. It contains compounds with antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. Thyme is often used in the following ways:

Respiratory Health: Thyme is known for its expectorant properties and is used to soothe coughs, relieve congestion, and support respiratory health.
Digestive Aid: Thyme is used to ease digestive issues such as indigestion, bloating, and stomach cramps.
Antiseptic and Antifungal: Thyme can be used topically as an antiseptic and for treating minor skin irritations and fungal infections.
Varieties: Thyme comes in various cultivars, each with its unique characteristics. Some popular thyme varieties include common thyme, lemon thyme, caraway thyme, and creeping thyme. Each variety may have subtle differences in flavor and growth habits.

Growing Thyme: Thyme is a perennial herb that is relatively easy to grow. Here are some key points for growing thyme:

Location: Plant thyme in a sunny spot with well-drained soil. It prefers a pH between 6.0 and 7.5.
Planting: You can start thyme from seeds, cuttings, or purchased plants. Space plants about 12 inches (30 centimeters) apart in the garden or use containers for smaller varieties.
Watering: Thyme is drought-tolerant and prefers slightly dry conditions. Water the plants when the soil is dry to the touch.
Pruning: Regularly trim thyme plants to promote bushier growth and prevent legginess. Harvesting the leaves for culinary or medicinal use also helps keep the plant healthy.
Other Uses:

Ornamental: Thyme is often grown for its attractive foliage and can be used as a ground cover or in rock gardens.
Bee Attractor: Thyme flowers are highly attractive to bees and other beneficial pollinators, making it a beneficial addition to gardens.
Thyme is widely available at garden centers and can be grown both outdoors and indoors in pots. It is a versatile herb that adds a unique flavor to dishes and offers potential health benefits. Whether you use thyme in cooking or enjoy its aromatic presence in the garden, it is a delightful herb to have on hand.

Thyme seeds are the small, dry, and dormant form of thyme plants that can be used to grow new thyme plants. Here's some information about thyme seeds:

Seed Varieties: Thyme seeds are available in different thyme varieties, including common thyme (Thymus vulgaris), lemon thyme (Thymus citriodorus), caraway thyme (Thymus herba-barona), and creeping thyme (Thymus serpyllum). Each variety may have unique characteristics, such as flavor, growth habit, and flower color.

Purchasing Seeds: Thyme seeds can be obtained from garden centers, nurseries, and online seed suppliers. Ensure you choose a reputable source to get quality seeds.

Germination: Thyme seeds typically have a moderate germination rate. Germination can take anywhere from 7 to 21 days, depending on the variety and growing conditions. Thyme seeds require favorable conditions to sprout, including warmth, moisture, and light.

Starting Seeds Indoors:

Timing: Thyme seeds can be started indoors 6 to 10 weeks before the last expected frost date in your area.
Seed Starting Mix: Fill seed trays or pots with a well-draining seed starting mix. You can also create a mix using equal parts of potting soil, perlite, and vermiculite.
Sowing Seeds: Sprinkle the thyme seeds evenly over the surface of the soil. Lightly press the seeds into the soil or cover them with a thin layer of vermiculite. Thyme seeds require light to germinate, so do not bury them too deep.
Watering: Moisten the soil gently, ensuring it is evenly moist but not waterlogged. Use a spray bottle or a watering can with a fine spout to avoid disturbing the seeds.
Light and Temperature: Place the seed trays in a warm location with temperatures around 65°F to 75°F (18°C to 24°C). Thyme seeds require light to germinate, so place them in a well-lit area or use a grow light if needed.
Germination: Keep the soil consistently moist and provide good air circulation. Germination should occur within a few weeks.
Transplanting Seedlings: Once the thyme seedlings have grown a few inches tall and have developed a few sets of leaves, they can be transplanted into individual pots or into the garden. Space the seedlings about 12 inches (30 centimeters) apart.

Outdoor Sowing: Thyme seeds can also be sown directly into the garden soil once the danger of frost has passed. Prepare the soil by removing weeds and loosening it. Sow the seeds on the surface and lightly press them into the soil. Keep the soil evenly moist until the seeds germinate.

Care and Maintenance: Thyme plants require well-draining soil and full sun (at least 6 to 8 hours of direct sunlight per day). Water the plants regularly, allowing the soil to dry out slightly between waterings. Trim the plants regularly to promote bushier growth and harvest the leaves for culinary or medicinal use.

By following these steps, you can grow thyme from seeds and enjoy the aromatic and flavorful herb in your garden or kitchen. Adjust the planting and care practices based on your specific climate and growing conditions for the best results.

To plant thyme seeds, follow these steps:

Timing: Start thyme seeds indoors 6 to 10 weeks before the last expected frost date in your area. Alternatively, you can sow the seeds directly outdoors after the danger of frost has passed.

Seed Starting Mix: Fill seed trays or small pots with a well-draining seed starting mix. Thyme prefers soil that is slightly alkaline with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. You can also create your own mix by combining equal parts of potting soil, perlite, and vermiculite.

Sowing Seeds:

Moisten the seed starting mix slightly before sowing the seeds. This will help the seeds make contact with the moisture in the soil.
Sprinkle the thyme seeds evenly over the surface of the soil. Aim for a density of about 2 to 3 seeds per inch (2.5 centimeters).
Lightly press the seeds into the soil, but avoid burying them too deep, as thyme seeds require light to germinate.
Cover and Water:

Cover the trays or pots with a clear plastic dome or a plastic wrap to create a mini greenhouse effect. This helps retain moisture and provides a consistent environment for germination.
Water the pots gently after sowing the seeds to ensure the soil is evenly moist. Avoid overwatering, as excessive moisture can lead to rot.
Place the pots or trays in a warm location with temperatures around 65°F to 75°F (18°C to 24°C). Thyme seeds require warmth for germination.
Germination and Care:

Keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged. You can mist the soil or water from the bottom by placing the pots in a tray of water and allowing the soil to absorb the moisture.
Germination usually takes around 7 to 21 days, depending on the variety and conditions. Be patient and continue to provide appropriate care during this time.
Once the seedlings have grown a few inches tall and have developed a few sets of leaves, they can be transplanted into individual pots or into the garden if the frost has passed.
Outdoor Planting (if applicable):

Choose a sunny location in your garden with well-drained soil.
Dig small holes or create shallow furrows in the soil, spacing them about 12 inches (30 centimeters) apart.
Transplant the thyme seedlings, gently removing them from the pots and placing them in the holes or furrows.
Backfill the soil around the seedlings and firm it gently to ensure good soil-to-root contact.
Care and Maintenance:

Water the thyme plants regularly, aiming to keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged.
Thyme is a low-maintenance herb and does not require much fertilization. If needed, you can apply a balanced organic fertilizer sparingly.
Prune the thyme plants regularly to promote bushier growth and prevent them from becoming leggy. Harvesting the leaves also helps keep the plant productive.
By following these steps, you can successfully plant thyme seeds and cultivate healthy thyme plants. Adjust the planting and care practices based on your specific climate and growing conditions for the best results.

To grow thyme seeds in pots, follow these steps:

Selecting the Pot: Choose a pot that has drainage holes to allow excess water to escape. A pot with a diameter of at least 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 centimeters) is suitable for growing thyme.

Soil Preparation: Use a well-draining potting mix or create your own mix by combining equal parts of potting soil, perlite, and coarse sand. Thyme prefers slightly alkaline soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5.

Sowing the Seeds:

Moisten the potting mix slightly before sowing the seeds. This will help the seeds make contact with the moisture in the soil.
Sprinkle the thyme seeds evenly over the surface of the soil. Aim for a density of about 2 to 3 seeds per inch (2.5 centimeters).
Lightly press the seeds into the soil, but avoid burying them too deep as thyme seeds require light to germinate.
Watering:

After sowing the seeds, water the pot gently to ensure the soil is evenly moist. Avoid overwatering, as excessive moisture can lead to rot.
Keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged throughout the germination period and as the plants grow.
Placement and Sunlight:

Place the pot in a sunny location where the thyme plants can receive at least 6 to 8 hours of direct sunlight per day.
Thyme thrives in full sun, so choose a location that provides ample sunlight.
Germination and Care:

Thyme seeds usually germinate within 7 to 21 days, depending on the variety and conditions. Be patient and provide appropriate care during this time.
As the seedlings emerge, thin them out to leave the strongest and healthiest plants, spacing them about 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 centimeters) apart.
Water the thyme plants regularly, ensuring the soil remains evenly moist. Avoid overwatering or letting the soil become waterlogged.
Fertilization is generally not necessary for thyme grown in pots. If desired, you can apply a balanced organic fertilizer sparingly, following the manufacturer's instructions.
Maintenance:

Trim the thyme plants regularly to promote bushier growth and prevent them from becoming leggy. Harvesting the leaves also helps keep the plant productive.
Prune the plants after flowering to maintain their shape and encourage fresh growth.
By following these steps, you can successfully grow thyme from seeds in pots. Remember to adjust the watering and care according to the specific needs of your thyme plants and growing conditions. Enjoy the aromatic and flavorful thyme leaves as they mature and enhance your culinary dishes.

Thyme is a versatile herb that adds a delightful flavor and aroma to a wide range of dishes. Here are some common ways to use thyme in your culinary creations:

Seasoning: Thyme leaves are excellent for seasoning and enhancing the flavors of various savory dishes. Use it to add depth and earthiness to soups, stews, sauces, and marinades. It pairs particularly well with vegetables, poultry, lamb, and fish.

Herbs de Provence: Thyme is a key ingredient in the classic French herb blend called Herbs de Provence. This blend typically includes thyme, rosemary, savory, marjoram, and oregano. Use it to season roasted meats, grilled vegetables, and other Mediterranean-inspired dishes.

Stuffing: Add thyme to stuffings and dressings for a savory and aromatic flavor. It complements ingredients like bread, onions, celery, and poultry.

Roasting: Sprinkle fresh thyme leaves over roasted vegetables, potatoes, or meats before cooking. The herb infuses its flavor into the dish as it cooks, enhancing the overall taste.

Infused Oil or Vinegar: Create thyme-infused oils or vinegars by steeping fresh thyme sprigs in a bottle of oil or vinegar. This allows the flavor of thyme to infuse into the liquid, providing a ready-to-use seasoning for salads, marinades, or dipping sauces.

Herbal Butter: Combine minced thyme leaves with softened butter to create an herb-infused butter. Spread it over bread, melt it on grilled meats or vegetables, or use it as a flavorful topping for cooked pasta or rice.

Herbal Tea: Thyme can also be used to make an herbal tea. Steep fresh or dried thyme leaves in hot water for a few minutes, strain, and enjoy. Thyme tea is often consumed for its potential health benefits and soothing properties.

When using thyme, it is best to add it during the cooking process to allow its flavors to develop and meld with other ingredients. If using fresh thyme, remove the leaves from the stem before adding them to your dishes. You can also dry thyme leaves for later use by hanging bundles upside down in a well-ventilated area until they are dry and brittle.

Experiment with thyme in different recipes to discover your preferred combinations and enjoy the distinctive flavor and aroma it brings to your culinary creations.

Thyme has a long history of traditional use as a medicinal plant. It contains various compounds that are believed to have therapeutic properties. Here are some potential health benefits and traditional uses of thyme:

Respiratory Health: Thyme is often used to support respiratory health. It has expectorant properties that may help loosen mucus and relieve coughs. Thyme tea or steam inhalation with thyme oil is commonly used for respiratory congestion and bronchial conditions.

Digestive Aid: Thyme has been traditionally used to aid digestion. It may help stimulate the production of digestive juices and relieve indigestion, bloating, and gas. Thyme tea or incorporating thyme in cooking can support healthy digestion.

Antimicrobial Properties: Thyme possesses antimicrobial properties due to compounds like thymol and carvacrol. These compounds may help inhibit the growth of certain bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Thyme oil has been used topically for skin infections and as a natural preservative.

Anti-inflammatory Effects: Some studies suggest that thyme has anti-inflammatory properties. It may help reduce inflammation in the body, including conditions like arthritis. However, more research is needed to establish its efficacy in this regard.

Antioxidant Activity: Thyme contains antioxidants that help neutralize harmful free radicals in the body. Antioxidants are important for overall health and may contribute to the prevention of chronic diseases.

Oral Health: Thyme has been used traditionally for oral health. Its antimicrobial properties may help combat bacteria that cause bad breath and gum disease. Thyme oil is sometimes included in natural mouthwashes or toothpaste.

Stress Relief: Thyme is considered an herb with calming properties. The aroma of thyme essential oil may help promote relaxation, reduce stress, and improve mood.

It's important to note that while thyme has a history of traditional use in herbal medicine, scientific research on its specific medicinal properties is ongoing. Always consult with a healthcare professional before using thyme or any herbal remedy for medical purposes, especially if you have any underlying health conditions or are taking medications.

Additionally, it's essential to differentiate between culinary use and therapeutic use. Culinary use of thyme in moderate amounts is generally safe, but medicinal use may require different preparations and dosages, and it's important to follow appropriate guidance.