Menu
Your Cart

Spinach seeds

Packing / number of seeds: 5 g (about 400 organic seeds in one pack). Sowing rate. Ha..
3.69USD
Showing 1 to 1 of 1 (1 Pages)

Under this category in our online catalog we have selected for you a great variety of varietal seeds of the green leafy crop, increasingly accepted as a real "super food", namely Spinach. This vegetable has not only earned a place of honor in kitchens around the world, but is also considered a real healthy bliss, whose green leaves literally boil and boil with useful nutrients.

Spinach is a herbaceous plant, part of the cruciferous family. Its history varies from centuries ago, with its homeland believed to be Persia. Even when it was brought and cultivated in China, spinach was known under the name "Persian plant". Green culture reached Europe thanks to the Moors, who brought it around the 11th century. In France, the love for spinach appeared thanks to the Queen of France, Catherine de' Medici, who brought her master chefs from Florence with her when she took office. The certain presence of spinach in meat dishes was understood by the name - "a la Florentine".

Despite its rich history, many believe that the huge popularity of spinach comes from a favorite children's show that began its broadcast in the middle of the last century - Popeye the Sailor. In the beloved animation, the main character Popeye the Sailor regularly eats his dose of spinach to become healthy and strong. The beloved character of young and old has popularized the leafy vegetable so much that it makes it easier for many parents whose children do not like the otherwise tasty vegetable the first time.

Spinach is a green leafy crop that is characterized by being one of the first to bloom after the cold winter months. Its nutritional content makes spinach an excellent choice for the spring menu. Its leaves are rich in many useful substances, such as vitamins A, C, vitamin B1 (thiamine), vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B6, vitamin K, vitamin E, from mineral salts, spinach is rich in calcium, potassium, copper, zinc , manganese, phosphorus, magnesium and iron. In fact, spinach is one of the best sources of iron. However, when taken alone, a very small part of the mineral content is taken, so it is recommended to combine it with lemon juice, because iron is absorbed better, in combination with vitamin C.

Approximately 80 grams of fresh spinach contains nearly half of the body's daily dose of vitamin C.

In addition to being very useful, spinach is also dietary. It is low in calories as well as fat, but is a good source of dietary fiber and protein. With its high fiber content, spinach favors bowel function. It has a significant amount of flavonoids in its composition, which have a powerful antioxidant effect and improve the body's function, helping it to get rid of harmful toxins.


Consuming this fresh vegetable benefits the body in numerous ways. It is believed to improve the function of the brain, have a good effect on the work of the heart and support the function of the nervous system.

Very useful, very tasty and with many uses in cooking. It is consumed both fresh and cooked. It can be made into a salad, mashed, added to a local dish, to an omelette or casserole.

However, the most popular application of the vegetable remains fresh salad. It combines perfectly with cheeses, nuts, avocados, tomatoes, eggs, as well as with sweet-tasting ingredients, such as strawberries and oranges.


Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is a leafy green vegetable that is known for its nutritional value and versatility in culinary preparations. Here's some information about spinach:

Nutritional Value: Spinach is highly regarded for its nutrient density. It is rich in vitamins A, C, and K, as well as minerals like iron, calcium, and magnesium. It also contains antioxidants, dietary fiber, and various beneficial plant compounds, which contribute to its health benefits.

Appearance and Varieties: Spinach has dark green, tender leaves that are typically flat or slightly crinkled. There are different varieties of spinach, including savoy spinach (with curly, wrinkled leaves) and smooth-leaf spinach (with flat, smooth leaves). Baby spinach refers to the younger, more tender leaves.

Culinary Uses: Spinach is a versatile vegetable that can be eaten both raw and cooked. It has a mild, slightly earthy taste. Common culinary uses of spinach include:

Salads: Raw spinach leaves can be used as a base for salads, either on their own or mixed with other greens. Spinach pairs well with a variety of toppings and dressings.

Sauteing and Stir-Frying: Spinach can be quickly cooked by sautéing or stir-frying. It wilts down and becomes tender, making it a popular addition to pasta dishes, stir-fries, omelets, and more.

Steaming and Boiling: Spinach can be steamed or boiled, either on its own or as an ingredient in soups, stews, and casseroles. Cooked spinach can also be used as a filling for dishes like lasagna or stuffed vegetables.

Smoothies and Juices: Spinach is a popular addition to smoothies and juices, as it adds a nutritious boost without significantly altering the flavor. It blends well with other fruits and vegetables.

Growing Spinach: Spinach is a cool-season vegetable that prefers cool temperatures and moderate sunlight. It can be grown from seeds or transplants. Sow spinach seeds directly in the garden or start them indoors and later transplant them outside. Spinach grows best in well-drained soil with organic matter. It requires consistent moisture but avoid overwatering. Harvest spinach leaves when they are large enough to use, typically around 6 to 8 weeks after sowing.

Health Benefits: Spinach offers numerous health benefits due to its rich nutritional profile. It is low in calories and carbohydrates but high in fiber, making it beneficial for weight management and digestive health. The vitamins and minerals in spinach support immune function, bone health, and cardiovascular health. The antioxidants present in spinach have been associated with reducing the risk of chronic diseases.

Spinach Popeye Myth: The association between spinach and Popeye, the fictional cartoon character, popularized the idea that spinach is exceptionally high in iron. However, this was based on a decimal point placement error in the 19th century, which mistakenly inflated the iron content of spinach. While spinach is a good source of iron, it is not exceptionally high compared to some other vegetables.

Spinach is a nutritious and versatile vegetable that can be enjoyed in various dishes. Whether consumed raw in salads or cooked in a variety of recipes, spinach provides a range of health benefits and contributes to a well-rounded diet.

If you want to grow spinach from seeds, here are the steps to follow:

Seed Selection: Choose high-quality spinach seeds from a reputable source. Look for seeds that are fresh and viable for optimal germination. Consider selecting a variety of spinach that suits your preferences, such as savoy spinach or smooth-leaf spinach.

Timing: Spinach is a cool-season crop that prefers temperatures between 50 to 70°F (10 to 21°C). It is best to sow spinach seeds in early spring or late summer/early fall, depending on your climate. Avoid planting during the hottest part of the year, as spinach prefers cooler temperatures.

Soil Preparation: Prepare the soil before sowing the spinach seeds. Spinach prefers well-draining soil with a slightly acidic to neutral pH level (around 6.0 to 7.0). Remove any weeds or debris from the planting area. Work in compost or well-rotted manure to improve soil fertility and moisture retention.

Sowing Seeds: Sow the spinach seeds directly into the prepared soil. Plant the seeds about ½ inch (1.3 cm) deep and space them about 2 inches (5 cm) apart in rows that are around 12 to 18 inches (30 to 45 cm) apart. You can also sow the seeds in wide rows or in containers if space is limited.

Watering: After sowing the seeds, water the soil gently to ensure proper moisture. Keep the soil consistently moist but avoid overwatering, as this can lead to rotting. Watering with a gentle spray or using a soaker hose is ideal to prevent disturbing the seeds.

Germination: Spinach seeds typically germinate within 7 to 14 days, depending on the temperature and conditions. Once the seedlings emerge, thin them out if necessary to maintain proper spacing between the plants. Thinning ensures that each spinach plant has enough space to grow and receive adequate sunlight.

Care and Maintenance: As the spinach plants grow, provide regular care to promote healthy growth:

Watering: Continue to water the spinach plants regularly, aiming for about 1 inch (2.5 cm) of water per week. Adjust watering based on weather conditions and the moisture needs of the plants.

Fertilization: Spinach plants benefit from regular feeding. Apply a balanced fertilizer according to the manufacturer's instructions, or use organic options such as compost or well-rotted manure.

Weed Control: Keep the area around the spinach plants free from weeds, as weeds can compete for nutrients and water. Regularly remove any weeds that appear near the plants.

Harvesting: Spinach leaves can be harvested when they reach a usable size, typically around 4 to 6 weeks after sowing. Harvest outer leaves individually by gently pulling or cutting them off the plant. Allow the inner leaves to continue growing for future harvests. Harvesting regularly encourages new leaf growth.

By following these steps, you can grow spinach from seeds and enjoy a fresh, homegrown supply of this nutritious leafy green vegetable. Remember to adjust the timing and care practices based on your specific climate and growing conditions.

To grow spinach, follow these steps:

Select a suitable location: Spinach thrives in cool weather and prefers a spot with partial shade to full sun. Ensure the location has well-drained soil.

Prepare the soil: Loosen the soil to a depth of 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 cm) and remove any weeds or debris. Incorporate organic matter such as compost or well-rotted manure to improve soil fertility and moisture retention.

Choose the right time for planting: Spinach is a cool-season crop that prefers temperatures between 50 to 70°F (10 to 21°C). The optimal time to plant spinach depends on your location. In most regions, you can sow spinach in early spring, as soon as the soil can be worked. You can also plant spinach in late summer or early fall for a fall harvest.

Sow the seeds: Plant spinach seeds directly into the prepared soil. Sow the seeds about ½ inch (1.3 cm) deep and space them about 2 inches (5 cm) apart in rows that are around 12 to 18 inches (30 to 45 cm) apart. You can also sow the seeds in wide rows or containers if space is limited.

Watering: After sowing the seeds, water the soil gently to ensure proper moisture. Keep the soil consistently moist but avoid overwatering, as this can lead to rotting. Watering with a gentle spray or using a soaker hose is ideal to prevent disturbing the seeds.

Thinning and spacing: As the spinach seedlings emerge, thin them out if necessary to maintain proper spacing between the plants. Thinning ensures that each spinach plant has enough space to grow and receive adequate sunlight. Aim for a spacing of about 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 cm) between plants.

Care and maintenance: Proper care is essential for growing healthy spinach:

Watering: Continue to water the spinach plants regularly, aiming for about 1 inch (2.5 cm) of water per week. Adjust watering based on weather conditions and the moisture needs of the plants.

Fertilization: Spinach is a relatively light feeder, but you can apply a balanced fertilizer or compost to the soil before planting. Avoid over-fertilization, as it may result in excessive foliage growth at the expense of the edible leaves.

Mulching: Apply a layer of organic mulch around the plants to conserve moisture, suppress weed growth, and regulate soil temperature.

Weed control: Keep the area around the spinach plants free from weeds, as they can compete for nutrients and water. Regularly remove any weeds that appear near the plants.

Harvesting: Spinach leaves can be harvested when they reach a usable size, typically around 4 to 6 weeks after sowing. Harvest outer leaves individually by gently pulling or cutting them off the plant. Allow the inner leaves to continue growing for future harvests. Regular harvesting encourages new leaf growth and extends the harvest period.

By following these guidelines, you can successfully grow spinach in your garden and enjoy a fresh supply of this nutritious leafy green vegetable. Remember to adjust the planting and care practices based on your specific climate and growing conditions.

Spinach is a versatile leafy green vegetable that can be enjoyed in various ways. Here are some common methods of preparing and eating spinach:

Raw: Spinach can be eaten raw in salads or added to sandwiches and wraps. Rinse the spinach leaves thoroughly to remove any dirt or debris, and pat them dry. Use the leaves as a base for your salad and combine them with other vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, and dressings of your choice. Baby spinach leaves are particularly tender and suitable for raw consumption.

Steamed or Blanched: Steaming or blanching spinach helps to soften the leaves and retain their vibrant green color. To steam spinach, place the leaves in a steamer basket over boiling water and steam for a few minutes until wilted. Alternatively, blanch the spinach by briefly immersing it in boiling water for about 30 seconds, then transfer it to ice water to stop the cooking process. Steamed or blanched spinach can be enjoyed as a side dish or added to various recipes.

Sautéed or Stir-Fried: Sautéing or stir-frying spinach adds flavor and creates a slightly wilted texture. Heat some oil or butter in a pan over medium heat, add washed and dried spinach leaves, and stir continuously until they wilt down, which usually takes just a few minutes. Season with salt, pepper, and any other desired herbs or spices. Sautéed spinach can be served as a side dish, incorporated into pasta dishes, mixed with scrambled eggs, or used as a topping for pizza.

Added to Soups and Stews: Spinach can be a nutritious addition to soups, stews, and curries. Add washed and chopped spinach leaves to the dish during the last few minutes of cooking. The heat will wilt the spinach, and it will blend well with the other flavors in the dish.

Blended in Smoothies: Spinach can be a valuable addition to smoothies, providing a boost of nutrients without significantly affecting the taste. Add a handful of washed spinach leaves to your favorite smoothie recipe, along with fruits, yogurt, or other ingredients. The vibrant green color of spinach blends well with most fruits and can result in a nutritious and refreshing beverage.

Added to Pasta Dishes: Spinach pairs well with pasta. Add wilted spinach leaves to cooked pasta along with some olive oil, garlic, and Parmesan cheese for a simple and delicious dish. You can also incorporate spinach into lasagna, stuffed shells, or other pasta bakes.

Spinach-based Dips: Spinach can be used to make flavorful and nutritious dips. One popular example is spinach and artichoke dip. Sauté spinach with garlic, combine it with artichoke hearts, cream cheese, sour cream, and grated cheese, and bake until bubbly. Serve the dip with crackers, bread, or vegetable sticks.

Spinach is a versatile vegetable that can be enjoyed raw or cooked, making it a nutritious addition to your meals. Experiment with different cooking methods and recipes to find your favorite way of incorporating spinach into your diet.

See more vegetable seeds online and todoraki art